This Week’s Bakery Bulletin

Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Issue #25


We’re excited to start our wintertime baking routine! You can order bread starting Thursday morning (October 8th) for next week’s Wednesday (October 14th) pickup. If you’ve ordered before, just log in (see the sidebar at the left) and then click on “order bread” or “bread menu” and select the breads you’d like.

If you’ve never ordered bread through the website, you’ll click on the “register now” link, pick a username and password, and enter your information (name, email, and phone numbers). Then you can place your order!

If you’d like a weekly email reminder to order bread, and to know about the bread flavors we’ll be baking, sign up for my weekly bakery bulletin (see the sidebar on the left). Below, you’ll find a list of breads available for order this week, for pickup next Wednesday.

You’ll also find a recipe at the end of the newsletter—for a delicious salad inspired by Alaskan ingredients! 

In case you can’t make the website work, you can always email me at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or call me at 677-3712.

the bread ordering deadline

You’ll need to order your bread by MIDNIGHT on Sunday, so we have time to plan our bake, feed our sourdough, and pre-ferment the dough!  When you order the bread, you can choose to “pay when you pick up your bread,” or you can pay via PayPal. By all means, use PayPal if you prefer—but I’m even happier to get your checks or cash when you come pick up your bread.

bread pickup locations
Pick-up locations for Wednesday, October 14th
1.  Side Street Espresso, 412 G Street, downtown: 8-10am
2. Over the Rainbow Toys, 12201 Industry Way, D5, next to the Huffman Post Office: 4-6pm

Please note: Pickup times have changed a little bit from last year, so please note that you now have a two-hour window at each location. 

If you need to call me during a pick-up time, you can reach me on my cell phone at 748.3712. At other times,  please call me at home/the bakery: 677-3712.

Alison’s blog
If you’d like more savory and healthful recipes, you can find lots more of them on my blog about cooking and eating local food: Alison’s Lunch. You can even sign up for my blog posts (about local food, cooking, and recipes) to be delivered to your email! .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if you have trouble signing up, and I can help you.

It’s the only year-round program featuring local Alaskan produce! Would you like to pick up a box of beautiful and economical local vegetables when you need produce? Subscribers to our CSA program aren’t limited to our short farmers’ market season to get Alaskan produce; we’re loading boxes year-round! During the winter, local produce includes cabbages, carrots, potatoes, onions, beets, and turnips. To add variety to these nourishing and savory staples, we add all sorts of vegetables and fruits from certified organic farms Outside. Each box also contains a newsletter loaded with my delicious, healthy recipes tailored to the week’s vegetables. [$35/box]

You can sign up for a box once a week, twice a month, or more sporadically—you choose the dates! You pre-pay for your box, then pick it up at one of several locations in Anchorage, Eagle River, or the Valley. Please visit our website for more information!

featured bread this week

recipe of the week


green salad with roasted beet slices, toasted sunflower seeds and a mustard-dill vinaigrette

We had Alaskan beets from our Alaskan Glacier Valley Farm CSA box, and Dan sliced and roasted them up a couple of days ago (am I well-married, or what?). We also had some beautiful Alaskan green & red leaf lettuce left over from last week’s box (have you ever noticed how long lettuce lasts when you get it in a CSA box or from the farmers market?). I almost always have at least a drizzle of my mustardy, garlicky red wine vinaigrette in the fridge, and tonight was no exception. I remembered reading in my rebar: modern food cookbook about the author’s Polish heritage, and how beets, sunflower seeds and dill are familiar flavors. So I sprinkled some dried dill into my vinaigrette (what the heck, why not?) and toasted up some sunflower seeds.

We served it up with grilled salmon (Alaskan, of course, out of the freezer) that Dan rubbed with Halibut Cove Dill Rub from Summit Spice & Tea Co. I don’t know what else is in the rub other than dill, but it’s salty and tasty! Clearly, this is no traditional Polish meal, but it was fun to take some of the flavors and go with them. They were great!

I make a lot of this dressing at once, without the dill, and then keep it in the refrigerator to use all the time. It keeps really well, is yummy and creamy without any eggs or cream in it (mustard is the emulsifying agent), and is great with a variety of different salads.

6 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
4 medium cloves garlic, chopped coarsely
1 teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt
1-2 tablespoons honey
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
pinches of dried dill (or, even better, fresh dill, if you have it)

Put first 5 ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Slowly pour in oil to make a creamy emulsion. Taste and season with more salt or honey if it needs it.
Take out several spoons-full of the dressing and add a couple of pinches of dried dill, or big pinches of fresh dill, chopped. Stir it in and let it sit and let the dill flavor the dressing while you make the rest of the salad. You can save the rest of the dressing, without the dill in it, for other salads. (Here’s a suggestion for another salad using this dressing on my blog, Alison’s Lunch.)

oven-roasted beet slices
Even if you’re not a beet fan, I think you’ll love these slices. If you’ve been wondering what to do with the beets in your CSA box, here’s the ticket!

1 pound of Alaskan beets—the biggest you can find.
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt

1. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
2. Peel the beets and slice them into thin slices—I did about 1/8-inch slices in my food processor, but do whatever you like. 
3. Coat a large baking sheet with non-stick spray or oil. (This makes clean-up a lot easier.)
4. Toss the beet slices with olive oil and salt.
5. Spread the beet slices out in a single layer on the baking sheets. Roast for about 30 minutes, or until they are cooked and tender when you stab them with a fork.


1 large head of leaf lettuce, washed, dried, and torn into bite-sized pieces, or a large bowl of baby salad greens or stemmed baby spinach
mustardy-dill dressing
¼ cup sunflower seeds, toasted in a skillet until golden and fragrant
roasted beet slices

Toss the salad greens with dressing to your taste. Put a big pile of salad on a plate and top with the beet slices. Sprinkle toasted sunflower seeds over the salad and serve.

To see an easy recipe for grilled salmon, check out this link for grilled southwestern salmon. Just substitute the dill rub or just use salt and pepper instead of the southwestern spice rub.

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