This Week’s Bakery Bulletin

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Issue #32

Hello!!

You still have two more weeks to buy bread for yourself and your friends this holiday season!  This week we’re baking the fruited almond holiday bread again, but the 100% whole-grain pan loaves (like the Alaskan potato sourdough bread!) and hearth loaves (toasted walnut, anyone?) also make lovely gifts!  Check out the “long term bread schedule” on our website to see which breads we’ll be making in our two remaining bakes during December.

Don’t forget that the bread freezes and thaws wonderfully, so you can order the bread ahead of time if you like, and then freeze it until you are ready to give the bread away.

Another locally-grown gift idea is the Farmers Market Cookbook, and you can order it along with your bread! I packed the book with 100 pages of delicious, healthy, and simple recipes that showcase our flavorful, fresh local Alaskan produce. The recipes provide inspiration for ways to use Alaskan vegetables, fish, fruits, bread, and other products that can be found locally. Mostly vegetarian and vegetable recipes, many of which are dairy- and egg-free, the cookbook focuses on recipes that have fantastic flavor and top-notch nutritional value. The directions in each recipe include lots of hints about how to prepare these recipes with speed and efficiency.

If you’ve ordered before, just log in (see the sidebar at the left) and then click on “order bread” or “bread menu” and select the breads you’d like.

If you’ve never ordered bread through the website, you’ll click on the “register now” link, pick a username and password, and enter your information (name, email, and phone numbers). Then you can place your order!

If you’d like a weekly email reminder to order bread, and to know about the bread flavors we’ll be baking, sign up for my weekly bakery bulletin (see the sidebar on the left). Below, you’ll find a list of breads available for order this week, for pickup next Wednesday.

You’ll also find a recipe at the end of the newsletter for a delicious and nutritious soup made with butternut squash, with a very easy and yummy garnish that really makes it fun!

In case you can’t make the website work, you can always email me at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or call me at 677-3712.

the bread ordering deadline

You’ll need to order your bread by MIDNIGHT on Sunday, so we have time to plan our bake, feed our sourdough, and pre-ferment the dough!  When you order the bread, you can choose to “pay when you pick up your bread,” or you can pay via PayPal. By all means, use PayPal if you prefer—but I’m even happier to get your checks or cash when you come pick up your bread.

bread pickup locations
Pick-up locations for Wednesday, December 16th:
1.  Side Street Espresso, 412 G Street, downtown: 8-10am
2. Over the Rainbow Toys, 12201 Industry Way, D5, next to the Huffman Post Office: 4-6pm

Please note: Pickup times have changed a little bit from last year, so please note that you now have a two-hour window at each location. 

If you need to call me during a pick-up time, you can reach me on my cell phone at 748.3712. At other times,  please call me at home/the bakery: 677-3712.

Would you like to see a video of us baking your bread? Our bakery is a small commercial kitchen attached to our house on the lower Anchorage Hillside.

Alison’s blog
If you’d like more savory and healthful recipes, you can find lots more of them on my blog about cooking and eating local food: Alison’s Lunch. You can even sign up for my blog posts (about local food, cooking, and recipes) to be delivered to your email! .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if you have trouble signing up, and I can help you.

GLACIER VALLEY FARM COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA)
It’s the only year-round program featuring local Alaskan produce! Would you like to pick up a box of beautiful and economical local vegetables when you need produce? Subscribers to our CSA program aren’t limited to our short farmers’ market season to get Alaskan produce; we’re loading boxes year-round! During the winter, local produce includes cabbages, carrots, potatoes, onions, beets, and turnips. To add variety to these nourishing and savory staples, we add all sorts of vegetables and fruits from certified organic farms Outside. Each box also contains a newsletter loaded with my delicious, healthy recipes tailored to the week’s vegetables. [$35/box]

You can sign up for a box once a week, twice a month, or more sporadically—you choose the dates! You pre-pay for your box, then pick it up at one of several locations in Anchorage, Eagle River, or the Valley. Please visit our website for more information!

featured bread this week

recipe of the week

image

butternut squash soup & apple confit

This is one of my very favorite soups, and it’s one of my favorite things to do with squash! It’s based on a recipe in Annie Sommerville’s Fields of Greens.  Make the stock with the vegetable trimmings the day before you make the soup, or just before you make the soup. And here’s another option, which I did this week.  Instead of peeling the squash first and then cooking it in the stock, you can also just halve and scoop the seeds out of the squash, the roast it in the oven until it’s soft (at 350 to 400 degrees for 45 minutes to an hour), and then scoop the squash out into the stock and cook the soup until everything softens and melds. Whatever fits your schedule best!

The Easy Vegetable Stock

squash seeds, strings, and peels (or just the seeds and strings if you’re baking the squash)
1 large onion
3 large carrots
3 celery ribs
8 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
4 bay leaves
sea salt or kosher salt

1. Scrub the vegetables and chop them roughly into 1-inch chunks. Toss them in a soup pot with 1 teaspoon salt, and add 2 quarts of water.
2. Bring everything to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer, uncovered for 30 minutes. Strain.

The Soup

4-5 cups easy vegetable stock
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large or 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
sea salt or kosher salt
¼ cup white wine
3-4 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into large cubes
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 sweet red apples, peeled, cored, and sliced
½ cup apple juice

1. Heat the olive oil in a soup pot and add the onion, ½ teaspoon salt and a pinch of pepper. Saute over medium-high heat until the onions are slightly caramelized, about 15 minutes. Deglaze the pan with most of the white wine.
2. Add the squash and 1 teaspoon of salt to the onions. Add just enough stock to barely cover the squash (about 2 cups); the squash breaks down quickly and releases its own liquid as it cooks.  Cover the pot and cook over medium heat for 20 to 30 minutes, until the squash is very soft. Puree the soup in a blender or with an immersion blender, and thin it with stock to reach the desired consistency. Return the pureed soup to the pot, cover, and cook over low heat for 30 more minutes. Taste for salt.
3. While the soup is cooking, make the apple confit. Warm the olive oil in a medium skillet and add the apples; sauté over medium-high heat, stirring to coat them with the oil. When they are heated through, add the remaining wine and cook for 1 or 2 minutes, until the pan is almost dry. Add the apple juice, cover the pan, and cook over medium heat for 10-15 minutes, until soft; cook uncovered for a bit if you need to reduce the liquid.
4. Stir half the confit into the soup, saving the rest for garnish. Season with salt and pepper as needed, and to serve, top each bowl of soup with a spoonful of apple confit.

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